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Concentration Courses

Students in each of the three MPH concentration areas take concentration specific courses to provide additional depth to the public health core. The number of credits required, and the courses available, vary by concentration and students are encouraged to review the concentration requirements when selecting courses. MPH students work with advisors to select concentration courses best suited to their individual professional goals.



Community and International Health

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None
Please click here to view the syllabus.

Examines models and principles of community development, social planning, social action, and public advocacy for health, and concepts and theories related to planned change.

Objectives:

  1. Understand the legal context for health care policy, analysis and decision-making.
  2. Realize the historical, complex and often discriminatory relationship between individual behavior and public health initiatives, and the relation to sociological and economic agendas.
  3. Gain a basic knowledge of community health care, the health care safety net, health insurance and access.
  4. Understand concepts, theories and models of health empowerment, behavioral change and the relation to community and health organization development.
  5. Distinguish models of policy development and their implications for effective health advocacy.
  6. Provide basic understanding of legislative processes, political agendas and imperatives, and how policy can be created through other than legislative means.
  7. Develop advocacy skills, including collaboration, consensus building, using media, and writing effective policy and advocacy communications. 

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: PUHE-GE 2361
Please click here to view the syllabus.

Identification and evaluation of programs designed to reduce health risks among individuals and communities, with a focus on factors influencing the design of interventions, choice of methods, ways to assess the magnitude of change effected by the intervention, and ethical issues raised by the interventions.

Objectives:

  1. Describe examples of local, national, and international interventions designed to address current public health problems.
  2. Identify basic principles that underlie the choice of health interventions, and evaluate their strengths and limitations.
  3. Analyze and evaluate the choice of program design and target population, and the effectiveness of specific health interventions.
  4. Describe the principal organizational and political barriers to the design and evaluation of health-related interventions.
  5. Identify the principal ethical issues involved in health-related interventions. 


Summer Semester
6 credits
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Prerequisites: None

Click here for more information about this course.

The seminar examines the impact of political change, and changes in the burden of disease on community health. Students examine how primary health care is delivered through the South African health care system; the current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases (including HIV, TB, Malaria and various cancers) in South Africa; specific issues related to reproductive health including the implementation of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention programs and issues in family planning. The course also examines challenges for health policy and service implementation, associated with the legacy of apartheid as well post-apartheid era developments. After a week of lectures, and field trips, students spend one week shadowing the activities of a community-based social advocacy groups or health NGO's, in order to gain insights into the important role civil society organizations play in community health in South Africa.

Three weeks of the course are spent in Cape Town and include lectures, seminars, and field trips in the Western Cape. During the third week of the course, students travel to rural areas od KwaZulu-Natal, which is the epi-center of HIV in South Africa to learn about research projects concerning HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment and other key health issues and examine health care delivery and community health issues from a rural perspective. During this segment of the course those students who choose to, are given the opportunity to stay overnight with a family living in the rural area. At the end of this week most students take a 3 day break to visit a game reserve near where the group has been staying. Back in Cape Town for the final week of the course students work on a presentation on the topic related to the work they were involved in during the second week of the course. 

The objectives will be achieved by focusing on the following content areas:

  • Reproductive health - an international perspective and past and present trends in South Africa
  • Gender-based violence
  • Infertility
  • Fertility and Contraception
  • Maternal Health
  • Terminator of Pregnancy
  • Cervical and Breast Cancer
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases and HIV 

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

The course provides an introduction about the theory, design, implementation, and evaluation of health communication programs.  Several resources are used to allow students to acquire practical knowledge and skills in health communications planning and implementation. Case studies, resources, research tools and examples of different media channels are reviewed and analyzed to explore how to reach different target audiences with the most effective health communication interventions.

Objectives:

  1. Define communication theories and methods for behavior change (behavior and social science theories, marketing/social marketing models, mass communication theories and other models)
  2. Define key communication areas as well as methods for conducting outreach campaigns designed to improve the health of specific intended populations
  3. Describe standard techniques used in health communication planning for  specific intended audiences: research, planning, pre-testing,  production/ implementation, launch and evaluation
  4. Describe the strengths, limitations and criteria for use of a range of health communication channels and areas: radio, print, television, Internet, interactive computer programming, drama, interpersonal communications vehicles, community-based events, digital media, and others
  5. Define methods used to develop and evaluate health communication materials and activities as well as to measure program outcomes 

Fall semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: none

Please click here to view the syllabus.

An introduction to the issues of health and health care on a global basis. The course focuses on the nature and scope of major worldwide health problems and the study of different national and international approaches to their solution.

Objectives:

  • Describe the relationship of economic development to disease causation and public health. 
  • Identify general and specific policies and programs developed by various countries to prevent disease and promote health. 
  • Describe the principal international organizations involved in health policy and the delivery of health services. 
  • Explain how culture and religion influence health policies and programs. 
  • Acquire the necessary knowledge to articulate global health concerns and policies that can address these concerns. 

 

 

 

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites:  None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

A cross-cultural framework is used to compare the health status of populations and families and factors that affect their health in societal subgroups (for example, urban, rural, poor, women and children, and the elderly). The course emphasizes the effects of secular changes in women's roles and status and other societal, economic, and environmental trends on population and family health.

Objectives:

  1. Identify general and specific ways in which gender affects health status in international settings.
  2. Describe the effects of factors such as age, urbanization, education, income, culture, and religion affect family health.
  3. Identify secular changes in women's roles and status that affect family health.
  4. Describe societal, economic, and environmental trends in international family health. 


January Intersession
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Click here for more information about this course.

Students will examine the impact of migration on issues of public health in Puebla, Mexico. Through a combination of lectures, seminars, research, field trips & fieldwork, the students will learn about the major health problems of the Poblanos, the structure & capacity of the Mexican health care system, & the role of traditional health practices in a rapidly changing society with deep ancient practices.

 

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

In this course, students will develop an understanding of the impact of policies and the provision of services on the health disparities in reproductive health care. Within a framework of reproductive justice, students will examine the background and development of family planning, prenatal care, HIV/AIDS and abortion services in the United States as they relate to gender roles, attitudes about sexuality, institutional racism and health care service delivery. Students will develop analytical skills as well as the latest techniques for health education as they examine the most challenging issues and current research in the field of reproductive health.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define healthy sexuality and describe its relationship to reproductive health care.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the critical issues related to reproductive health care in the United States.
  3. Exhibit health education skills associated with reproductive health care.
  4. Describe the impact of U.S. public policies on the provision of reproductive health care. 


 

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

A hands-on approach to grant writing including development of skills in locating potential funding sources and the use of appropriate grant-writing style & technique. Students are guided through the development of a grant proposal, from locating sources of funds; through development of program objectives, background, & methods; to the peer review process.

Objectives:

  1. Understand the various sources of grant funding, how to identify funding opportunities and how the source of funding affects proposal writing;
  2. Practice communication, collaboration and relationship building skills;
  3. Understand the statutory and regulatory context for not for profit organizations and the role of the grant-writer in strategic development.
  4. Understand the criteria used by evaluators of grant proposals;
  5. Learn how to be an effective written communicator;
  6. Engage in developing and writing a grant/funding proposal.

 

 

Global Health Leadership

 

Fall Semester
3 Credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2160, GPH-GU 2106

*Cross-listed with PUHE-GE 2318.  Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course is devoted to flexible forms of inquiry suited to the local context of global public health research. Sometimes known as 'action research', 'rapid assessment, and 'community-based participatory research' these approaches share a commitment to working closely with and in communities to identify health risks and effective interventions for ameliorating them. Although field research may include surveys and other forms of quantitative research, the emphasis in this class will be on qualitative methods with mixed method approaches included where appropriate. The focus will be on introducing the basic content/skills of on-the-ground field research under challenging conditions, i.e., shortages of time and resources as well as cultural/ linguistic differences. There are additional aspects to learning these methods (e.g., data analysis) that require much more time and skill development than is possible in this brief introductory course. Interested students are strongly advised to take additional coursework in qualitative methods.


Spring Semester
4 credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2110; microeconomics recommended
* Cross-listed with HPAM-GP 2852 

We tend to be ethnocentric in our views of health care organization and policy. A look abroad, however, can provide insights about problems at home. In spite of differences in the organization and financing of their health care systems, most countries share a number of common problems with the United States. First, is the question of deciding - or not explicitly deciding - what proportion of GNP should be devoted to health and welfare. Second, is the problem of agreeing on appropriate criteria to allocate health and social service expenditures. Third, is the problem of how to implement established policies: through regulation, promotion of competition, budgeting, or reimbursement incentives directed at health care providers. In this class, students will be asked to become "experts" about a health system of their choice outside the United States but in a nation belonging to the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Students with a special interest in developing nations and the transitional economies of Central and Eastern Europe may choose to become an expert in a second health system, as well, but all students must choose one relatively wealthy nation that they can compare to the United States. We will examine a range of health systems with respect to their own published data, as well as data collected and analyses conducted by international organizations, e.g. the World Health Organization (WHO), OECD, the World Bank, and UNICEF. The readings, lectures and class discussions will focus on the common problems and themes noted above as they affect the organization and financing of health systems in wealthy OECD nations. We begin with a discussion of the impact of globalization on health system development and an overview of health system models around the world. Second, we examine conceptual frameworks and methods for health systems analysis, and a range of myths about health systems with universal coverage. Third, and this is the heart of the class, we apply these approaches to the empirical analysis of health systems in selected nations and examine the extent to which the available evidence supports or refutes these myths. Throughout the class, we will also consider issues of medicine, culture and public health infrastructure; and the strengths and weaknesses of alternative methods of comparative analysis in cross-national research.





Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2106

Please click here to view the syllabus.

The emergence of new pathogens and drug resistance, as well as increased transmission opportunities caused by human migration, political instability and breakdown of healthcare infrastructure, has led to a rising prevalence of infectious disease. This course aims to provide training in the biology, epidemiology and control of emerging diseases. It will provide the necessary skills to analyze the interplay between human host and pathogen in both evolutionary ecology and statistical epidemiology frameworks. There will be a discussion of "Darwinian Medicine". Specific bioterrorism pathogens will be discussed, as well as methods of identification and predictive modeling of a bioterrorism incident. In addition to lectures, class time will include practical data handling. Discussion of both methodological and substantive epidemiology papers from the recent literature will be led by the students.

Fall/Spring Semesters
4 credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2995, 2996, 2106, 2371

* Cross-listed with PADM-GP 2875
Please click here to view the syllabus.

 

This advanced course develops a set of analytic skills that are used by some policy analysts. It focuses on impact analysis. The goals of the course are to (a) extend familiarity with methodologic issues, including various study designs, measurement problems, and analytic approaches; (b) provide hands-on experience in management, analysis, and presentation of data; and (c) develop skills in reading, critiquing, and reporting on policy-relevant impact analyses written by others. The emphasis of the course is on learning by doing, through data analysis, data presentation, and study critiquing activities. Students work on developing the ability to convey findings in text and table format.

 

 

 

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Dental, oral and craniofacial diseases and disorders are amongst the most common health problems in all regions of the world. Caries, periodontal infections, orofacial pain, temporomandibular joint diseases (TMD), and salivary gland dysfunction in the form of Sjogren's syndrome, significantly affect the quality of life of people around the world due to their high prevalence and incidence. Some of these conditions are more prevalent in certain countries or regions, while others are found virtually in all countries, but to varying degrees. Other oral health burdens are imposed by a variety of oral diseases and disorders with oral manifestations, such as HIV/AIDS, birth defects, head and face injuries, and head and neck cancers. As oral health is part of total health and is essential to quality of life, the World Health Organization, through international collaborative partnerships, gives priority to integration of oral health with general health programs at community or national levels for oral health promotion and disease prevention. This course will cover several thematic units (basic philosophy, epidemiology of oral diseases, etiologies of oral disease, social and culture risk factors, prevention of oral disease in public health), each of which will include a lecture component and a group discussion component.

Spring Semester
4 credits
Prerequisites: none

Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course describes the developing relationship between genomics and genomic technologies with
the health of populations in a global context. Topics covered include genomic technologies and their
applications, genetic epidemiology, the human microbiome, infectious disease genomics, and the
ethical, legal and social implications of genomics. The course consists of lectures, group discussions
focused on current scientific papers, guest seminars, and a hands-on sequencing workshop. Students
will leave the course with an increased awareness of how sequencing of microbes, parasites and
human genomes helps develop better diagnostics and therapies and a greater understanding of
human health globally.

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2106

Infectious diseases, especially HIV, TB, malaria and acute respiratory infections (ARI) contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. This course will focus on the biology, epidemiology and control of these infectious diseases. This is essential training for practitioners of global public health.

Fall Semester
4 credits
Prerequisites: none

Please click here to view the syllabus.

After discussing definitions of health in international agreements and the general influences of globalization on health and health equity, the course will explore the roles and responsibilities of national health leadership, primarily Ministries of Health and governmental institutions, in assuring the health of their populations and the different strategies and variable capacities of national governments in developed, developing and countries in transition. The role of regional and local governments, professionals, civil society, communities and individuals, will also be explored.

We will then consider in some depth the role, functions and effectiveness of global organizations affecting health in the UN, NGO and business sectors as well as multilateral and bilateral donors and how they interact with each other and with national leadership. Finally we will look at emerging instruments for global health governance, how they operate and their effectiveness for promoting health action at the country level.

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course will focus on the considerable and increasing burden of disease due to chronic diseases, mental health, substance use (alcohol, tobacco, other drugs), risk factors (obesity, lack of physical activity), and injuries within the developing world. It will present methods for measuring the burden of non-communicable disease, review approaches to program and service development to modify risk factors, present lessons learned from successful developing country programs, and discuss implications for health services development and international development policies.

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: GPH-GU 2106

Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course will develop an understanding of epidemiologic concepts and methods that will be a backbone to in depth training in specialty areas. It will provide a technical and conceptual training in study design, multivariant analysis, sample size calculations and other key epidemiologic techniques. It will build on the basic core course. Students must enroll in a required lab section.

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Review and learn more on research designs and methods for testing etiology
  • Understand issues based on examples from varied study designs and scientific literature
  • Characterize sources of biases in observational studies & experimental studies; and apply strategies to minimize biases in design and analytical processes.
  • Discuss potential causes of confounding in epidemiologic studies, and learn about different strategies to identify and test confounding effects.
  • Study different disease/health models (e.g., mediation, moderation), and ways of testing the models
  • Critically review epidemiologic papers
  • Applied appropriate methodology to design a study in the area of your interest.
  • Choose appropriate analytical methods for causal model testing
  • Perform some data analysis on EPIINFO and SPSS

 

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

Children in disadvantaged communities of developing countries have rates of untreated oral diseases that range from 32-90%. In over forty of the least developed countries, many communities have no basic or emergency care for their populations. This course will allow the student to: a) understand the epidemiology of oral diseases in children, b) understand and develop ways to meet the challenge of untreated oral diseases in disadvantaged communities, c) identify significant issues that affect the oral health of children worldwide and proposed ways to improve the oral health of children, and d) acquire the skills necessary to develop oral health promotion strategies directed at children across the world.

Fall/Spring/Summer
4 credits
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with CORE-GP 1018
Please click here to view the syllabus.

The primary purpose of the microeconomics core course is to enable you to use microeconomic thinking, concepts and tools in your professional public service work. Accomplishing this also requires refreshing and strengthening your quantitative skills. The course begins with the basics of supply and demand and market operations, and uses this as the context for considering consumer and organizational decisions within a given market structure. The course builds to applying economic analysis to a variety of public issues such as the effects of taxation, the market structure of health care, the impacts of the minimum wage, the effects of international trade and various approaches to environmental externalities. By the end of the course you should be able to articulate the economic context and analysis of a public problem, use economic concepts in managerial and policy decisions, and progress to second level courses confident of your understanding of microeconomics and its tools.

Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course will provide an overview of key topics in public health for migratory persons: demographics; specific population groups and their circumstances and rights, including refugees, immigrants, asylees, and migrants; epidemiologic issues of displaced persons, including the shifting burden of disease, nutrition, environmental and occupational concerns; health and human rights; ethics; torture and other violence; PTSD, and other acute and chronic mental health concerns. Immigrant and Migratory Health will be approached from various perspectives, including historical, demographic, epidemiologic, access(economic, legal, linguistic, cultural, and institutional), life cycle, environment, including occupation and nutrition, and policy. The course will impart to students the skills necessary to develop an integrated approach to the care of immigrant and migratory populations.


Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None

In this course the basic concepts and the importance of oral health promotion in the community are discussed. The course builds on the basic epidemiology course and other core courses as they apply to the planning and evaluation of community-based oral health programs designed to improve the oral health of a target population. It compares cross national oral health promotion programs and discusses current trends in the oral health sector as it pertains to their goals, programs, costs and achievements. Environmental, social, cultural and behavioral mediators of oral health and access to care will be discussed as well as specific approaches to prevent and promote good oral health.

Fall/Spring/Summer Semesters
3 credits
Please click here to view the syllabus.

Click here for more information about Practicum

The practicum is an action oriented experience that allows students to: apply public health core competency skills and principles learned in the classroom to real global health work; to observe and learn from interactions with leaders and mentors in the field; and to explore questions and engage in group problem-solving around the work experience. It also allows students assess their own collaborative leadership skills and competency development needs while exploring new career opportunities.

At the end of the practicum, the student will:

  • Have gained direct work experience in a health organization (not his/her own) addressing global public health issues
  • Understand and be able to analyze the environment and operations of a health organization addressing global health issues
  • Be aware of the roles played by and skills needed of individual leaders in a global health organization
  • Be able to reflect on his/her competency development needs, leadership skills, and future career plans in relation to the concepts, theories, and approaches contained in the MPH program

 

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites: None
Please click here to view the syllabus.

Common mental disorders—depression, anxiety, substance abuse—present the largest disabling disease burden for people in the world today—rivaling HIV, TB, or malaria in that respect. They exacerbate risk for, and severity of, medical illness. They are implicated in other social issues such as violence, poverty, and individual and collective efficacy. Yet they tend to get lost on the global health agenda. Why this discrepancy between relevance, and resources? Lack of familiarity with the interventions, measuring challenges, population-based strategies, and disease-language that captures these issues is in part to blame. Public health approaches to common mental disorders are also only recently demonstrating new rigor and maturity. This course provides exposure to this increasingly relevant public health challenge, with a particular focus on low-income country settings and on the implications of mental health issues for global development efforts. It also will challenge students to think critically about the goals of public health more generally with respect to how health outcomes both reflect and further outcomes in other sectors—eg, education outcomes, criminal recidivism, economic and social participation.

 

Fall/Spring/Summer Semesters
4 credits
Prerequisites:
  GPH-GU 2196
*Cross-listed with PADM-GP 2171
Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course serves as an introduction to those evaluation tools most commonly used to assess the performance of publicly funded programs, in both the public and private sector. Topics include developing and assessing program theory, implementation and process assessment, methods of impact evaluation, and efficiency analysis (cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis). The focus is on critical analysis and understanding of both the underlying programs and their evaluations. 

 

Public Health Nutrition

 

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisite: NUTR-UE 119 Nutrition & Health
Please click here to view the syllabus.

Introduction to the concepts, principles, and scope of practice of public health nutrition. The course emphasizes the distinction between population-based and individual-based approaches to prevention and alleviation of diet-related conditions, and the societal, economic, environmental, and institutional barriers to improving the nutritional status and health of diverse population groups.

 

Objectives:

 

  1. Define the scope of practice of public health nutrition.
  2. Distinguish population-based public health approaches to nutrition intervention from methods that focus on changing the behavior of individuals.
  3. Identify the principle biological, behavioral, cultural, socioeconomic, and nutritional determinants of diet-related disease risks among diverse population groups.
  4. Describe how poverty and its consequences affect food intake, nutritional status, and the effectiveness of nutrition intervention programs.
  5. Describe how race, class, and gender affect food security, nutritional status, and the effectiveness of nutrition intervention programs.
  6. Identify the principle food safety problems in industrialized and developing countries and public health approaches to ensuring the safety of the food supply.
  7. Describe the principal policies and programs that address food insecurity, hunger, and nutritional deficiencies among diverse population groups.
  8. Identify the causes of the "nutrition transition" in developing countries where health problems of overnutrition increasingly coexist with problems of undernutrition.
  9. Define public health policy, needs, goals, and approaches to nutritional intervention in diverse populations, barriers to implementation of such policies, and methods of evaluation for their effectiveness. 

 

Fall/Spring Semesters
3 credits
Prerequisites:  None
Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course is based on the premise that a rational and desirable goal for any society is to develop and maintain a food system that promotes health, protects the environment, is sustainable, and supports the livelihoods of its participants.

The course deals with how governments—particularly that of the United States—design and implement policies and programs to foster social goals such as ensuring a sufficient, safe, affordable, and sustainable food supply.  It examines why and how governments do or do not decide to set policies; reviews how stakeholders in the food system become involved in and influence policy development; identifies the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence stakeholder and government positions on policy issues; and describes the ways in which these factors promote or act as barriers to policies aimed at promoting the health of people and the planet.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  1. Define what is meant by policy, and explain how policies differ from programs.
  2. Describe the principal areas of domestic and international nutrition, food, and agriculture policy and the most important current issues related to those policy areas.
  3. Identify the government agencies primarily responsible for each area of food and nutrition policy, explain their roles, and describe their principal policy goals and method for achieving them.
  4. Explain what is meant by “food system,” the issues raised by this term, and the principal stakeholder groups and positions on food system issues.
  5. Identify the ways in which social, cultural, economic, commercial, and institutional factors promote or act as barriers to the design and implementation of agriculture, food, and nutrition policies and programs, and the ways in which these policies and programs affect health.
  6. Identify the principal health–related problems linked to food and nutrition. Explain how these problems, in both U.S. and international populations, may (or may not) be linked to domestic and international food policy.
  7. Identify and apply the methods by which stakeholder groups affect the design and implementation of agriculture, food, and nutrition policies.
  8. Describe arguments that support and counter the position that government should not be involved in the food choices of individuals.


Spring Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites:  None


Principles & application of nutrition for healthy mothers, infants, children, & adolescents with emphasis on current research related to normal growth & development.


Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites:  None

Theory & analysis of nutrition assessment methods in community & clinical settings. Dietary, clinical, anthropometric, & biochemical assessment methods & their limitations & strengths are discussed using current research. 

Fall Semester
1-3 credits
Prerequisites: None

Please click here to view the syllabus.

This course introduces the current issues related to global nutrition. It integrates basic information about food intake and nutrition into discussions of major nutrition-related problems around the world. The course will present and discuss international, national and community-level policies and programs designed to improve the nutritional status of populations and to overcome barriers to their implementation. This course will also address nutritional status as a “continuum” whereby populations can simultaneously have members with severe under-nutrition, good nutritional status, and over-nutrition. The course will focus on the burden of under-nutrition but will also several “emerging” or special topics including the nutrition transition, weaning and complementary feeding, and women and health.

OBJECTIVES
1) Understand the nature and scope of the key global nutritional problems
2) Identify cultural, social, behavioral, environmental and economic determinants that affect the dietary intake and nutritional health status of people in various world cultures.
3) Compare international and dietary requirements and recommendations
4) Critically evaluate public health interventions by agencies and organizations concerned with nutrition and health, food production and food processing, food aid, and economic and social development, to raise the nutritional status of some specific population groups (e.g., agricultural strategies, nutrition education, political policy changes, women development and health care programs).
5) Develop a topic that addresses at least one issue related to the food and nutritional health status of individuals globally.

 

Fall Semester
3 credits
Prerequisites:  PUHE-GE 2361 or NUTR-GE 2190

Fundamentals of nutrition epidemiology focused on the collection, analysis, & interpretation of data on dietary intake & nutritional status of diverse population groups. The course emphasizes critical evaluation of dietary assessment methods & the results of research studies associating intake of foods & nutrients or food consumption patterns with the risk of cancer, coronary heart disease, & other chronic diseases.

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